But is it worth dying over?

Yes, yes it is. Nothing is better than a good death; if there’s only one thing in life we can control, it’s how we die, or at least how we react to death, and our inevitable doom. Crazy Horse knew this better than most, when he uttered his famous “It is a good day to die” speech.

We are facing a crisis in our time unlike any other, where dying over living is arguably becoming, or at least ought to be becoming, an acceptable choice. Live life now while it’s going at least somewhat okay, when times are tough and unending, I will not fault you for wanting and choosing a way out.

People think that life is something that is cherished, but is it really? I don’t think so, nothing is sacred, to me at least anyways. There is a good essay on this subject called “Let Me Die”  by Narcissa Black, I recommend checking it out.

We are facing a time where immortality is within our reach, but as the Lenape reacted when first hearing about the immortality offered by the Christian Heaven, “who wants to live forever?” Eventually you’ll grow so bored with life you may just want out, sheer boredom will do that for you.

The ultimate unknown is what happens after death, so why fear it? It’s inevitable anyways, might as well make peace with the Grim Reaper now while you can, we only have one life anyways. Do what you can now, damn the consequences. Carpe diem.

Resist to the end.

I have come to understand that resistance is futile, but I will continue to resist anyways. That is all I, you, and everyone else can do. Resist to the end. Always be defiant of authority, at least you could say you died with your honor intact.

Don’t go out with a whimper, go out with a bang. When the Jews following Simon bar Khokba during his infamous revolt, they knew that the end was coming, but rather surrender and live in slavery, they died free, killing themselves down to a man. When the Romans finally breached the walls, they only found a terrified woman and child hiding amongst the bodies.

They were so shocked they pardoned the woman and child on the spot. Hannibal’s final words were thusly:

Let us ease the Roman people of their continual care, who think it long to await the death of an old man.

Livy’s Ab Urbe Condita, Book XXXIX, 51

He committed suicide shortly thereafter.

How many revolutions ended in failure? How many were successful? How can we even define “success” and “failure?” How can we define what “works” and what “doesn’t work?” The only thing that stays the same is the fact that entropy increases, change and impermanence are facts of life.

The French Revolution ended with a tyrant taking the throne, the Russian Revolution ended with the rise of the party bureaucracy, and the victory of the Bolsheviks, who were anything but liberatory. The American Revolution, much vaunted here in the States, only resulted in one’s oppressors being closer to home, rather than far away across “the Pond.”The only successful revolution I can think of is the Haitian Revolution, and you only have to look at how Haiti has been kicked around by international powers for so long to see how that went.

Resistance is futile, resist anyway. Circumspice.

Ultimate Authority

I was told by my neurologist if I “had thoughts or feelings of hurting oneself or others to go to the emergency room immediately,” that was during a period of time I was considering ending my life. Life just wasn’t worth living. Only now do I realize the meaning of his words. I don’t think even he understood the full implication of what he said.

The state has the power to effectively imprison you for wanting out, it is the ultimate coercive power, the state decides when you die, you don’t even have control over your own life or death, the state does. It can decide when, and if, to put you down, but Christ forbid that someone try to appropriate that power from the state, to achieve the ultimate bodily autonomy.

Throwing you inside a psychiatric ward just for wanting out, it is the ultimate coercive power, the ultimate example of the unjust authority the state wields. It can decide when you die, how you die, but you can’t. It is illegal for you to take your own life, but not for the state, for whom nothing is illegal, since it makes and enforces the law.

Call it authoritarian, call it justified, whatever, don’t try to convince me of your moralistic hogwash, with your fallacious appeals to emotion. I am not swayed, I am only swayed by cold, hard fact, and the fact of the matter is is that the state’s ability to decide whether you live or die is the ultimate example of authoritarianism there is to be found.

I can be involuntarily committed to a psych ward for wanting out, the difference between being “lawfully” held captive and being “unlawfully” held captive is arbitrary, “unlawfully” holding someone captive deprives the state of the ability to “lawfully” hold someone captive. What is the difference? I am still in chains, it doesn’t matter to me whether my captors are acting within the purview of the law or not, they are my oppressors.

Tell me something, muse, why does the state get an exemption from criminality, but the people do not? Is the state above the law? “Nobody is above the law,” the liberal says. I say bollocks, someone has to enforce the law, and in order to enforce the law you have to be above it.

Liberalism is intellectually dishonest, inconsistent. Statist libertarianism is intellectually dishonest, inconsistent. Fascism of all things is more honest than liberalism, for at least the fascist will be plain with you what he wants, he doesn’t hold any pretenses to the contrary.

The liberal does, however, for they believe it to be “for your own good,” but does my “own good” entail being held captive, imprisoned, for wanting to take control over my own life? Foucault was right.